Home

Elsie Jackson's Kodak Brownie camera

Kodak PIXPRO Astro Zoom AZ421 16 MP Digital Camera with 42X Opitcal Zoom and 3" LCD Screen (White)

$70.33


Kodak Cameras: Digital Photography Review

On January 13, 2004, Kodak announced it would stop marketing traditional still film (excluding ) in the United States, Canada and Western Europe, but would continue to sell film cameras in India, Latin America, Eastern Europe and China. By the end of 2005, Kodak ceased manufacturing cameras that used the . Kodak licensed the manufacture of Kodak branded cameras to in 2005 and 2006. After 2007 Kodak did not license the manufacture of any film camera with the Kodak name.

The most popular Kodak cameras were the ones for cartridges. The first of these cameras was launched in 1963. By 1976, 60 million had been sold, six times more than all competitors put together had sold of this camera type, and also six times more than Kodak's previous big success, the (10 million , , and sold, made from 1957 to 1962). Another huge success was achieved with Kodak's type and which were introduced in 1972. But this time other companies took a larger share of the market by abandoning their own miniature film formats and introducing smart pocket cameras for 110 film instead. Kodak's decline began when it flopped with another miniature film format, the , in the 1980s.

kodak easyshare camera - Best Buy

An ad for one of the original Kodak Cameras

Kodak digital camera - Staples®

The most popular Kodak cameras were the ones for cartridges. The first of these cameras was launched in 1963. By 1976, 60 million had been sold, six times more than all competitors put together had sold of this camera type, and also six times more than Kodak's previous big success, the (10 million , , and sold, made from 1957 to 1962). Another huge success was achieved with Kodak's type and which were introduced in 1972. But this time other companies took a larger share of the market by abandoning their own miniature film formats and introducing smart pocket cameras for 110 film instead. Kodak's decline began when it flopped with another miniature film format, the , in the 1980s.

Eastman's goal in life was to simplify and to popularize photography. The first step towards that goal was the he introduced in 1888 which had a built-in 100-exposure paper costing $25, a huge amount. The box camera had to be sent back to the factory once all the exposures had been used. The customers got their cameras back with new film roll loaded into it, and the image prints. In 1890 a Kodak folding camera with built-in 48 exposure film roll followed. After years of advertising the brand Kodak the company was renamed Eastman Kodak Co. In 1900 Eastman had reached his goal, offering the Brownie rollfilm camera which cost only $1 including a 6 exposure film. Further film rolls cost just 15 cents. The was continued until 1970.